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Project Neon – Las Vegas, Nevada

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Project Neon is a corridor program developed to re-design I-15 between the Spaghetti Bowl and Sahara Avenue in the heart of Las Vegas.  This $1.5 billion project will affect hundreds of homeowners and business owners along the project corridor.  The project extends 3.7 miles and includes more than 13 lane miles of new bridges, a new HOV connector between US 95 and I-15, and direct access ramps at Wall Street, as well as local traffic improvements on Charleston Boulevard, Martin Luther King Boulevard, and Grand Central Parkway.  Project Neon is divided into 5 phases consisting of the following improvements:

Phase I

  • HOV connector between US 95 and I-15
  • Direct HOV access ramps at Wall Street
  • Reconstruction of the Charleston Boulevard Interchange
  • Grand Central Parkway/Western Avenue connector over Charleston Boulevard
  • Slip ramp from the Charleston Boulevard Interchange to Alta Drive/Bonneville Avenue

Phase II

  • Martin Luther King Boulevard/Industrial Road connector
  • Oakley Boulevard/Wyoming Avenue overpass at UPRR

Phase III

  • Full reconstruction of Charleston Boulevard Interchange
  • Reconstruction of I-15 north of Oakey Boulevard

Phase IV

  • Southbound I-15 ramps between Spaghetti Bowl and Sahara Avenue

Phase V

  • Northbound I-15 ramps between Spaghetti Bowl and Sahara Avenue
  • Reconstruction of I-15 south of Oakey Boulevard

The Federal Highway Administration issued a Record of Decision, or ROD, on Project Neon in October 2010, officially approving the project’s final Environmental Impact Statement.  The Nevada Department of Transportation is initiating phase one of Project Neon.

Through the end of 2012, the focus will be on property acquisition and major utility relocations.

Phase I is estimated to cost between $370M-$470M and the total cost of the project is estimated at $1.8B.  The Regional Transportation Plan has programmed funding through 2030, but it has not been appropriated.  Nearly $30 million has been appropriated in the Transportation Improvement Program for phase one in 2011.

Phase I could be under final design and construction as early as 2013 and last approximately 3 years.

Property Acquisition and Nevada Eminent Domain

We’ve talked to a handful of property owners in Phase I who have heard from the Nevada DOT but have not received an appraisal or an offer yet.   We anticipate that most of the property will be acquired in 2012, which was confirmed by the Nevada DOT.  Property owners affected by this project should know that they have rights if they choose to assert them.  Frequently, a property owner will only receive just compensation in Nevada eminent domain cases by allowing condemnation to occur.  In condemnation, a property owner can show that the rules for highest and best use will produce a higher price than the amount offered by the government.  Also, government appraisers often have long-standing relationships with the government, and their appraisals may contain other errors such as using incorrect comparables or ignoring severance damages.

Before settling with the government, it’s important to know what level of just compensation you are entitled to receive.   Learn more about Nevada eminent domain.

 


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